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  • Zonivue
    Posts: 6
    Joined: Nov 11th, 2006, 07:06
    David Isaac Tutorial - Drums Mixing Question
    Hi Guys, (apologies for the long post) I've bought and viewed the Mixing R&B Tutorial by David ISaac - pretty good, some good hints and work flow advice. A quick question, when he was mixing the drums, none of them had any Mic bleed on them? (although the snare had the tail of the hats) [b]Q1)[/b] My question is about how he/they cleaned them up? I'm quite new to it, and i'm so far using: - Cut Silence across the kick drum (although i then have to pass over the outputted regions as some snare hits get through and some double kicks don't get through) - i try to use a noise gate on the hi hats, - and if possble i cut silence on the snare, but again i loose a few softer hits and snare rolls So does does anyone have any advice or reference material of what they get from a "professionally recorded" drum kit? [b]Q2) [/b]Also I noticed he used nearly no compression across the tracks? Were the drum stems he used already compressed OR do people usually work with no compressors across the drums and tracks, and only use compression at the premastering stage? or across the main outputs to get a slightly louder/hotter signal? Sorry for the long post, just a few questions I hope more seasoned engineers/producers can answer. Cheers Ket
    Reply
  • Rounik Admin
    Posts: 8713
    Joined: Dec 16th, 2006, 08:13
    Re: David Isaac Tutorial - Drums Mixing Question
    Hi Ket, Welcome to the forums & glad you're enjoying the tutorial! I'm sorry, I can't answer your questions well, but I expect some good mics and noise gates and strip silence techniques are all used for the drums in Q1. As for Q2, I have no idea about the compression David Isaac used, but it does sound like the drums were well balanced before the Mixing stage. I think it depends on the style of music and equipment used as to how you use compression on the drums. But, I'd love to hear form some pro's on their compression & drums techniques too :-) Cheers Rounik
    Reply
  • AbbeyRhodes
    Posts: 76
    Joined: Jan 15th, 2008, 08:19
    Re: David Isaac Tutorial - Drums Mixing Question
    With electronic drums, it often depends on the source as to whether i use compression. Some drum sample libraries or drum machines use samples that are already compressed, and you can usually tell by looking at the wave form or just listening to it. If you're compressing something, make sure you have a purpose for it, and know the sonic outcome you're trying to achieve, don't just put a compressor on the kick or snare because that's what you're supposed to do. It may have already been done. Also a lot of live drum recordings are compressed at the input during tracking, as this helps to prevent clipping at the converters. They'll spend a good amount of time tweaking each channel, so you wouldn't want to undo all that hard work by slapping a big limiter on the kick. A more useful method could be to create a drum bus submix and put a gentle compressor on the bus. This is useful in situations where you've already achieved a good balance between the individual drum tracks, but need a little help getting the drums to sit with the rest of the mix. The David Isaac drum part sounds like it was played on an electronic kit, so bleed wouldn't be an issue. I have no idea why there's hihat bleed in the snare channel though.
    Reply
  • Zonivue
    Posts: 6
    Joined: Nov 11th, 2006, 07:06
    Re: David Isaac Tutorial - Drums Mixing Question
    Hi Abbey, thanks alot for your reply. all of it makes sense and that's the same route/thinking that I presently use...not sticking a compressor on it becuase it's the "done thing"... but thanks for clarifying this - as i'm not really in contact with many professionals. I wasn't so sure about how common place it is for people to compress a drum recording before hitting the tape/hard disk... i just figured the more dynamics the better, but as you say, it's a good safety net for not ruining a great take by clipping. and again, wondered why there was bleed in the snare from the hi hat if it was a midi/digital drum kit?... maybe put in there for the purposes of of the training video to demonstrate the principle. Cheers. Ket ps: when i've finisehd the mixes of the tracks i'm working on, would be good to get some feedback from people and share my work... thanks :)
    Reply
  • AbbeyRhodes
    Posts: 76
    Joined: Jan 15th, 2008, 08:19
    Re: David Isaac Tutorial - Drums Mixing Question
    Hi Ket, I probably should have clarified - the use of compression in tracking is one of those debatable topics. Some people do it, while other people watch them and that's when the argument begins. I once followed a friend into the studio on a day off, just to provide an extra set of ears as he had a big session at one of the top studios here in Sydney with a (relatively) big name Australian producer. They actually got into a little debate about the issue, as the producer wanted to run the drums through compression (an original Urei 1176 and SPL transient designer), but my friend was adamant that he receive the tracks uncompressed and unprocessed. This producer however insisted that he always placed a compressor after the pres on drum tracks. The issue to me is this: the original 1176 is one of the most prized compressors in the world, and you'll probably get a better sound out of it when compared to the Logic compressor my friend would have slapped on it. As i mentioned before though, some people would say this is a bad idea as you're stuck with the sound. Personally i'd be happy to let a good producer do whatever he does to get a good sound so i can watch what he does and then copy him if i like the result! Not everyone is this open minded though. I'd be happy to give some constructive feedback, as i'm sure others would too.
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