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  • Mike Oscar
    Posts: 6
    Joined: Dec 29th, 2008, 08:35
    Bounce
    What does Bouncing a track do to that track and why would one do it to a single track (or less?). Mike
    Reply
  • Rounik Admin
    Posts: 8713
    Joined: Dec 16th, 2006, 08:13
    Re: Bounce
    Hi Mike Bouncing a track renders it's contents, automation and all effects placed on the track to a new audio file. A couple of examples: - you want to render your tracks to audio and send them to a mixing engineer. - you want to render your mixed song and put it on cd or mp3 player so you can hear it outside of Logic. - you want to take a four bar loop or performance with fx etc and use it in a different or the same project, in a different way. The reasons to bounce to audio are manifold. Cheers Rounik
    Reply
  • Mike Oscar
    Posts: 6
    Joined: Dec 29th, 2008, 08:35
    Re: Bounce
    Rounik, thanks for the response. I have used Bounce in the past in much the same you describe, eg., when reaching the end of a project. However, what really prompted me to ask the original question was a comment by Martin very early in his Logic 8 101 tutorial. I've just tried to find it again and failed so I can't give an exact reference. But, as I recall, he is talking about the sine wave and says at one point "Okay, I'm just about ready to bounce my sine wave but . . . ". Now, at that point Martin hasn't really done anything to his audio file and it is one bar long. I immediately thought, why is he doing that? Can you shed any light? Mike
    Reply
  • Rounik Admin
    Posts: 8713
    Joined: Dec 16th, 2006, 08:13
    Re: Bounce
    Hi Mike, It's not an audio file: Martin created a Sine wave by using the default pacth of the EXS24 on a Software Instrument track. As it's not possible to see the waveform of a MIDI event without other non-Logic plug-ins, Martin bounced the EXS24 sound (sine wave) to audio. There are plenty of times when in the middle of a track it's beneficial to bounce parts or whole tracks to audio too: e.g. - You Mac's cpu is struggling with the cpu intensive instruments and plug-ins you're using...solution: freeze or bounce the track to audio. - You want to be able to see the waveforms (e.g. a drum tracks) to be able to edit then more effectively. - You want to apply some effects to a sound (e.g. reverse the sound of a crash cymbal). Solution: Bounce to audio and reverse it in the sample editor. I'm sure there are loads more reasons to bounce too... Cheers Rounik
    Reply
  • MikeOscar
    Posts: 5
    Joined: Dec 30th, 2006, 05:51
    Re: Bounce
    Ah ha! Now I see what is going on. Thanks Rounik. Mike
    Reply
  • Rounik Admin
    Posts: 8713
    Joined: Dec 16th, 2006, 08:13
    Re: Bounce
    :-)
    Reply
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