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  • Xyzefiy
    Posts: 102
    Joined: Apr 2nd, 2008, 08:09
    Mixing an Orchestral piece
    hello all I am just in the mixing stages of an orchestral style piece and I've done a basic mix and have things the way I like them. What I find is that at certain points where lots of instruments play together the outputs peak massively. I was just wondering what the best strategy to take was in terms of dealing with this. I've seen numerous tutorials on using compressors and limiters and the like in relation to beats and electronica. But do the same rules apply to orchestral instruments? Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Cheers John
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  • Rounik Admin
    Posts: 8713
    Joined: Dec 16th, 2006, 08:13
    Re: Mixing an Orchestral piece
    Hi John, well, lowering the overall level would be as good. If there is a quiet section then it's ok (from my understanding of classical music) if it doesn't register high on the levels. I would reduce the overall levels and using gentle compression may also be a good route to explore. Thanks Rounik
    Reply
  • Xyzefiy
    Posts: 102
    Joined: Apr 2nd, 2008, 08:09
    Re: Mixing an Orchestral piece
    Hey, cheers for the advice I am doing a video piece using Vienna, things need to be fairly upfront and already I've got the levels fairly low. I know people in the classical industry get pretty uppity about using compression and reducing the dynamic range and film soundtracks often get a hard time, but I am guessing that they use compression to reduce dynamic range in film scores etc, am I right? For the time being I'll follow your advice and see how it works. Cheers Rounik
    Reply
  • steveH
    Posts: 857
    Joined: Oct 17th, 2006, 05:19
    Re: Mixing an Orchestral piece
    IMHO dynamic range is very important in film scoring. That being said it is equally important to not make the soft stuff... TOO SOFT! A ton of compression is going to squeeze the life out of your mix. My guess is that the soft stuff is mixed to low. If you raise the the level of the quiet sections in the mixing process, then you can find a better level at your outputs that doesn't take away from the sffzs! Steve H
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