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  • Dixiviu
    Posts: 37
    Joined: Aug 7th, 2010, 03:43
    General Music Theory Question
    Hello Forum, I would appreciate if someone could correct me if I am wrong in my chord "progression" setup as I move from the key C to the key of Am (the parallel tone). 1. The Key of C (Roman numerals in parentheses, were I want to get the upper and lower case correct): C = I, Dm = ii, Em = iii, F = IV, G = V, B* = vii (here B* = Bdim) 2. Now I want the Key center/"tonic" to be Am, IS THIS CORRECT? Am = i, B* = ii, C = III, Dm = iv, Em = v, F = VI, G = VII 3. Finally: 1 and 2 share the same exact chords, however, as I moved from C to Am I have just added 2 to numerals of C? Best/Chord123
    Reply
  • Peter Schwartz
    Posts: 545
    Joined: Sep 15th, 2007, 06:04
    Re: General Music Theory Question
    In example 1, depending on how many notes you're playing, the B chord would be diminished if you're playing (B,D,F) or (B,D,F,G#). But it would be half-diminished if you played (B,D,F,A) -- a Bm7b5 chord. In example 2, as an isolated example, and assuming that you're playing one chord per bar, to my ears it's more like you're [i]returning[/i] to A minor rather than having it as a key center. That's because the C chord makes a strong statement. If your total progression is example 1 followed by example 2, then I'd say you're in C, in which case you wouldn't change the name of the chords just to suit the second half of the progression. That's my take. HTH.
    Reply
  • Dixiviu
    Posts: 37
    Joined: Aug 7th, 2010, 03:43
    Re: General Music Theory Question
    Dear Ski! Thank you so much for such a swift and elaborate response, I appreciate it :) Best/Chord123
    Reply
  • Wyxevia
    Posts: 34
    Joined: Jan 11th, 2010, 02:53
    Re: General Music Theory Question
    Hello, When moving to the "relative minor," which in this case is from C major to a minor, you might want to use a theory known as "secondary function" to give your cord progression a sense of monetary emphasis moving to the key of a minor. For example, by using and E7(dominant) before going to a minor, it gives your progression a strong cadence or feeling of movement, thus producing more of a feeling of moving to the bridge if you would. Using "secondary function" can really spice up your chord progressions and are effective when placed accordingly. Just a suggestion:) Cheers! B
    Reply
  • Dixiviu
    Posts: 37
    Joined: Aug 7th, 2010, 03:43
    Re: General Music Theory Question
    Hello Bobby! Thank you for the suggestion. :) Best/Chord123
    Reply
  • Wyxevia
    Posts: 34
    Joined: Jan 11th, 2010, 02:53
    Re: General Music Theory Question
    Your welcome and happy composing! Bobby
    Reply
  • Peter Schwartz
    Posts: 545
    Joined: Sep 15th, 2007, 06:04
    Re: General Music Theory Question
    Great call. Your suggestion of going to E7 before the A minor totally nails it. Definitely, if you were to play that chord before starting your second set of chords you would, as Bobby said, put the emphasis on the A minor, and at that point your chord progression would be correct as notated in the second example. The E7 sets up the A minor just like the G sets up the C major.
    Reply
  • Wyxevia
    Posts: 34
    Joined: Jan 11th, 2010, 02:53
    Re: General Music Theory Question
    Cool! The E7 will sound oh so nice when transitioning to the key of A minor. As a side note, the Beatles would use this technique often to move to the bridge of their songs, even moving to entirely new keys! Bobby
    Reply
  • Dixiviu
    Posts: 37
    Joined: Aug 7th, 2010, 03:43
    Re: General Music Theory Question
    Thank you Ski & Bobby! Best/Chord 123 :)
    Reply
  • Dekuruy
    Posts: 148
    Joined: Nov 23rd, 2007, 07:28
    Re: General Music Theory Question
    Hey Chord 123, You can also vary this by using E7 1st inversion (g# in the bass), especially if your coming from a G chord. Also, using E7 2nd inversion (b in the bass) can be good to use if your coming from a C chord. The strongest statement to get to A minor can be made by using E7 in root position, however. It all depends on what kind of sound you want. So many different ways to go from one place to another - lots of fun!
    Reply
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