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  • Jonathon
    Posts: 3
    Joined: Feb 19th, 2011, 11:25
    Audio clicks
    Hi. I have been making some slight adjustments to my vocal regions in Logic express using gain change and pitch change. Very small increments. I found, after making a full pass with these corrections and not hearing issues, playback of the track produced clicks in the audio. I turned off all inserts, still clicks. I deleted sections and brought in backup, still clicks. Finally, I imported the original sound files and this fixed it but, I did not have the pitch and gain corrections. Looking at the corrupted files I could see no clips or drop outs. Does making minor gain and pitch corrections lead to clicks if done improperly? Thanks for your help.
    Reply
  • Peter Schwartz
    Posts: 545
    Joined: Sep 15th, 2007, 06:04
    Re: Audio clicks
    Just to confirm, you're using the facilities in the sample editor to make your pitch and gain changes?
    Reply
  • Jonathon
    Posts: 3
    Joined: Feb 19th, 2011, 11:25
    Re: Audio clicks
    Correct.
    Reply
  • Peter Schwartz
    Posts: 545
    Joined: Sep 15th, 2007, 06:04
    Re: Audio clicks
    OK. Chances are that the processing you did caused the clicks. Especially when you're down at the waveform level you need to be extra careful about doing destructive editing at zero crossing points. Otherwise you're likely to generate clicks and pops. This applies not only to gain changes but also pitch changes. One thing you might try is to use the Silencer in the sample editor to remove the clicks. It's a surgical operation for sure, but you might be able to salvage your work using it. (And of course it all depends on how bad and frequent the clicks are). Post back if you want details on how to use the Silencer. Another approach in the sample editor is to isolate the clicks and then use the Fade In or Fader Out functions to try and smooth them over. As with the Silencer, this is going to be a surgical procedure. One thing you could try in the meantime is using the Remove DC Offset function on the files. This [i]may[/i] have the effect of lessening the impact of some of the clicks. And if it doesn't work, just use UNDO in the sample editor window itself (it has its own undo buffer). And for that matter, set your sample editor undo buffer to a fairly high number (at least 20) if you're going to be doing a lot of any of what I suggested to repair your audio. You might need to have that extra undo leeway, especially if you use the Silencer. Finally, before you attempt any repairs, make a complete backup copy of the entire project, including all audio assets.
    Reply
  • Jonathon
    Posts: 3
    Joined: Feb 19th, 2011, 11:25
    Re: Audio clicks
    Wow. That was a generous and thorough response. Thanks. I now understand that making even small gain and pitch changes in the waveform can cause issues and that I need to be careful to edit at the zero cross points. I will use this and the rest in the future. best. Jonathon
    Reply
  • Peter Schwartz
    Posts: 545
    Joined: Sep 15th, 2007, 06:04
    Re: Audio clicks
    Hi Jonathon, You're welcome! Just to complete the perspective, when it comes to adjusting the pitch, the Pitch/Time Machine can be extremely useful, for sure. But if a lot of re-pitching is needed, even just small amounts, sometimes you can get great results (and non-destructive too) by creating a duplicate channel, installing the pitch correction plugin (or a 3rd party one like Melodyne or Autotune), cutting specific words or phrases out of the original track's region(s) and moving them to this duplicated track. As far as gain changes are concerned, you can accomplish extreme gain changes (if necessary) by using a similar approach: cut the words/phrases from the main track and put them on another track. Raise the fader on that track or, for extreme changes of gain, install a Gain plugin and raise the gain there. Or, if you've got volume automation on the main track, copy the automation to the duplicated track but also put a Gain plugin on that, raising it as necessary. This way you can keep whatever automation moves you've previously established but just boost the overall output of that track. With any of these approaches, your vocal becomes a "mosaic" of different pieces, each being treated differently on different tracks. But with a little work you can massage the various pieces together to form a cohesive-sounding performance.
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