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  • Leisha
    Posts: 2
    Joined: Apr 13th, 2012, 12:22
    BPM in remixing a cheer song
    Hi, I'm trying to create a remix in Logic (or even GB) that we can use to combine about 3 pieces of songs into a routine. I had issues with the tempo doubling in GB, so now I'm trying to force myself to learn my Logic Express in hopes of having more options. Is it just a simple as selecting the songs and changing the tempo to say 166, then cutting and fading them together, or am I oversimplifying? Also, when I tried to change the tempo in Logic it didn't seem to do anything at all, and when I loaded a techno beat, it didn't have any volume...? The videos are great, but like anything worthwhile, time intensive! Thanks for the help!
    Reply
  • GaryHiebner
    Posts: 1434
    Joined: May 6th, 2007, 12:54
    Re: BPM in remixing a cheer song
    No, changing the tempo will not change the tempo of the audio file, only the project. There are a few ways you can go about doing this. 1. Use Logic's [b]Time & Pitch Machine[/b]e audio file into your Logic arrangement, then double click the file to bring up the Sample Editor. Go to Factory > Time & Pitch Machine. Here you can set the Original Tempo for the file, and the Destination tempo for the file. For example set the Original to 83BPM, and then the Destination to 166 BPM, then click Process and Paste. Bear in mind that this process is destructive, so it will replace the audio file with the new audio file. So make sure you have a copy of the audio file elsewhere before you do this, in case it is not to your liking. You can also try the different algorithms in the Pitch & Time Machine and test their results. 2. Or you can use Logic's [b]Flex Time[/b] option. Drag the audio file into the Arrangement Window. then change the tempo to 166BPM. Now hold down Alt and drag the bottom right corner/handle of the audio file. Now drag the audio file back. For example the audio file is 2 bars long, when you change the tempo the audio file will now be 4 bars long, drag it back so that it is now only 2 bars long and then the audio file will sit correctly on the new 166BPM grid. 3. Use the [b]Apple Loops Utility[/b]. Using this you will convert the sound into an Apple Loops. It is located under Applications > Utilities > Apple Loops Utility. Here you can set the Transient sensitivity for the audio file and assign attributes to the file. When you pull this Apple Loop song into your Logic project it will adjust according to the tempo set in the Logic project. You may get mixed results as doubling a track from 83BPM to 166BPM will bring in artifacts which may effect the sound drastically due to the time and pitch engine. But try it out and see if it works for you. I would say between 2 and 3 will be your best bet. Try them out and see which works best. Will your Logic project have different tempos for the different audio files throughout the project? Or are all the audio files going to be set to 166BPM
    Reply
  • Leisha
    Posts: 2
    Joined: Apr 13th, 2012, 12:22
    Re: BPM in remixing a cheer song
    Thank you! That helps. I haven't had chance to try your suggestions, but hope to soon. I am also wondering what the secret it to recording my high vocals, or in the job I just did, a growl around high C, without clipping or distortion. I have a pretty powerful high tone, similar to Christina Aguilera's high notes, and I do pull back but it doesn't seem to do the trick. This time, I reduced the dB on the main track a bit, recorded just that growl word on another track at a much reduced gain on the mic, then increased the dB on that track to blend with the other track. It wasn't perfect to my taste, but the client couldn't tell the difference. I hope this makes sense. I actually did this in GB as I'm not comfortable enough with Logic yet, and with the Yeti mic. I really need to cut some new demos, and I know this will be an issue, so I figured I'd ask before hand. One more thing, I'm looking into the AT2035 and have heard great things, but I'm not sure it would be better than the Yeti. Do you have any input there? Or maybe another mic would handle my singing vocals better? Those high notes can be harsh sometimes too, so that's another thing I have to think about. I can usually soften that part in the mix though. Sorry to ramble and thanks for your help!
    Reply
  • GaryHiebner
    Posts: 1434
    Joined: May 6th, 2007, 12:54
    Re: BPM in remixing a cheer song
    Hi Leisha, The important thing is that your signal does not clip. You can always fix volume fluctuations later with compression and volume automation later in the mic. But once an audio signal clips it cannot be fixed, unless the audio is recorded again. With regards to microphones, what is your budget? The AT2035 is a great microphone for its value, but it all depends on your budget.
    Reply
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